The Top Five Emails NOT to Send To Ooligan

As the publisher’s assistants at Ooligan Press, we serve as the first point of contact between the public and the press. In this role, we manage the Ooligan email accounts, and so we answer a number of questions—some of which we wish we didn’t have to. So here are our top five emails NOT to send to Ooligan Press.

    1. Any email addressed solely to “Gentlemen.”

This isn’t the nineteenth century anymore! And demographically speaking, the publishing industry is composed of more women than men. Here at Ooligan, most students are also female—including both of us publishers assistants, our two acquisitions managers, and of course, Head Publisher Abbey Gaterud. If you didn’t know, that’s okay, but may we suggest addressing your inquiries to “Ooligan Press,” or “To Whom It May Concern,” or “Ladies or Gentlemen” even.

    1. Submitting your romance/religion/romantic-religious/space-romance manuscripts.

We have submission guidelines, people! Please read them before you submit your manuscript to us. We don’t want to waste our time or yours.

    1. Requesting author contact information.

So you loved the book; that’s great! You want to tell the author how much you loved it; that’s also great! But we can’t give out an author’s private contact information. You know that. We know you know that because so many of those emails begin, “I know you might not be able to give me this information . . . ” You’ve answered your own question. NO, we cannot give you their information.

    1. Asking us to teach you things.

Ooligan is a teaching press and is operated out of Portland State University, but we have neither the time nor the budget to help teach you how to get your book published. There are plenty of excellent resources available online, and we offer a yearly conference, Write to Publish, which has the goal of demystifying the publishing industry for emerging writers. Each year, Write to Publish provides writers’ workshops, panels, vendors, and speeches hosted by authors and industry professionals, as well as raffles and writing contests. (You can get your tickets here.)

    1. Asking us to do tasks for free.

Ooligan is a teaching press, and we do work on manuscripts, but we are not going to do tasks for free for people looking to self publish. If you are looking to self publish and want someone to tag, edit, or market your book there are freelancers who would be happy to help you, but please do not email Ooligan wanting students to do that kind of work free of charge and for no credit.

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