Women Authors You Should Have on Your Reading List

Wed, 24 Aug 2016 16:00:41 +0000

Ooligan Press published Memories Flow in Our Veins in April, so hopefully most of you have had a chance to pick it up and enjoy the plethora of inspirational, powerful, and at times dark and creepy (pig’s head anyone?) stories and poems. As we’re enjoying the last bit of summer, many of you might get the urge to fill up your bags, baskets, and purses with food and books and curl up somewhere sunny to soak up any residual warmth, like plants before the inevitable rain and chill of fall. For your and my reading pleasure, I have lined up six books that I know I will be putting in my tote. The following list encompasses everything from feminism, gender, sexuality, identity, women’s right to education, and even the wacky world of internet fame.

  1. Men Explain Things to Me by Rebecca Solnit
    This book of essays will have you laughing, thinking, and pondering well after you’re done reading. Solnit writes with her characteristic scathing humor of the battle between the sexes and why men sometimes assume women don’t know things.
  2. We Should All Be Feminists by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
    This is a toteable must-read for women and men. With the grace and beauty that we have come to expect from Adichie, she writes a powerful argument for feminism. Adichie strives for clarity, awareness, and inclusion, dispelling negative connotations and myths around the concept of feminism.
  3. You’re Never Weird on the Internet (Almost): A Memoir by Felicia Day
    If you’ve never heard of Felicia Day, then you have a binge session in your future, because if you haven’t seen The Guild then you’re missing out. Day is witty, hilarious, and unforgettable as she answers the puzzling question of how the shy, awkward math major made it in Hollywood and became a TV personality.
  4. The Argonauts by Maggie Nelson
    Nelson writes with poignant frankness on feminism, love, sex and sexuality, and gender centering around her relationship with Harry Dodge, who is gender fluid. The unusual formatting of the text, along with Nelson’s startling honesty and unflinching reflection, make this book a true reading experience. You cannot miss this one.
  5. I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban by Malala Yousafzai and contributor Christina Lamb
    Malala’s story is hopefully familiar to many. The youngest-ever nominee of the Nobel Peace Prize, she has stood steadfast and strong in the face of death threats and an attempt on her life to work towards the ultimate goal of education for women. Inspirational does not begin to encompass the bravery of this young woman.
  6. Feminist Activity Book by Gemma Correll
    Okay, this one isn’t exactly a book you sit down and read cover to cover, but this sassy activity book looked like such fun that I couldn’t leave it out. Correll doesn’t take herself too seriously—this book educates as it makes you laugh. Who doesn’t love to color and promote equality?

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