Book

The Wax Bullet War By Sean Davis

$16.95

The day after September 11, 2001, Sean Davis—18 months out of uniform—strode into the Oregon National Guard’s recruiting office and reenlisted. An art school dropout slogging through the day-to-day monotony of a dead-end job, the attacks of 9/11 gave him a new sense of purpose and direction as a staff sergeant in Bravo Company. But what he finds in Iraq is nothing like what he expected. He discovers the oddities of a pop-up America in a hostile desert wasteland and is confronted with more questions and contradictions than answers.

Untangling the Knot: Queer Voices on Marriage, Relationships & Identity By Carter Sickels, Editor

$16.95

Ariel Gore participates in a marriage equality demonstration as she struggles for footing in her divorce. Trish Bendix receives a painful reminder that legal recognition of gay marriage is only one step toward societal recognition of her own marriage. Emanuel Xavier pays tribute to heroes of the LGBTQ community who didn’t live to enjoy the benefits of their activism.

The Ghosts Who Travel With Me By Allison Green

$15.95

When the flower children were flocking to Woodstock, Allison Green was in preschool. As a teenager, yearning for the counterculture movement she felt she just missed, she discovered the writing of Richard Brautigan, finding refuge in his visions of America and refusal to conform. Years later, however, she questions her attachment. Why would a lesbian and feminist writer identify with an author whose most famous work doesn’t even name its female characters? Searching for the answer, Green embarks on a journey retracing Brautigan’s steps in Trout Fishing in America. Along the way, she examines how we relate to the influences in our lives-the ancestors who created us, the past that shaped us, the writers who changed the way we saw the world–and how these elements intertwine to make us who we are.

Rhythm in the Rain: Jazz in the Pacific Northwest By Lynn Darroch

$21.95

Rhythm in the Rain is a nonfiction narrative about the jazz community in the Pacific Northwest that examines the people, places, and events that have made cities like Portland, Oregon, and Seattle, Washington, so popular among musicians. From the genesis of Jackson Street and Williams Avenue in the 1940s & ’50s with such legends as Ray Charles and Quincy Jones, to the modern voices of George Colligan, Rebecca Kilgore, and Esperanza Spalding, this book aims to encompass and illuminate the rich musical history of a region that, while not widely recognized as a jazz mecca, has seen its relevance within the local community. Written by local musician, radio broadcaster, and author Lynn Darroch, Rhythm in the Rain serves to inform and entertain, while showing that jazz is undoubtedly another of the countless cultural offerings this wonderful corner of the country has cultivated throughout its history.

Abraham Lincoln: A Novel Life By Tony Wolk

$14.95

Easter weekend, 1955, and Abraham Lincoln finds himself in Evanston, Illinois, mysteriously transported from 1865 at the height of the Civil War. Ninety years after his assassination, this wry, gaunt man, briefly relieved of the burdens of life in his own time, encounters a future society, idealized images of himself, reminiscences of friends and acquaintances long dead, and rare understanding from a woman very different from Mary Todd, his troubled wife. He returns to our nation’s highest office and the bloody conflicts of the War Between the States, a man restored by his experience of the future and determined—as ever—to preserve the Union. Writer and scholar Tony Wolk has been fascinated by Lincoln, “the essence of a good man,” for four decades. In this novel, Wolk skillfully blends history, fantasy, and the writer’s craft to bring Abraham Lincoln to life—Lincoln the man of flesh and blood as well as Lincoln the President. Readers emerge from a mesmerizing read with the sense of having been in Lincoln’s head and in his skin. Henceforth, references to Abraham Lincoln have a personal resonance: “The Father of Us All” is no longer a stranger.

The Survival League By Gordon Nuhanović & Julienne Buŝić

$10.95

In The Survival League, Gordon Nuhanović delves past Croatia’s post-war politics and focuses on its people struggling to heal old wounds and create new lives. With edgy, evocative prose, Nuhanović weaves darkly optimistic tales where nothing ever works out quite right: English lawns grow daisies instead of grass, and a romantic weekend in the mountains turns into a near-death experience. While war casts a shadow over all the characters, Nuhanović’s use of everyday events and occurrences makes The Survival League ring true in any culture.

The Weight of the Sun By Geronimo Tagatac

$14.95

The Weight of the Sun, a short story collection by Geronimo Tagatac, sparkles with an appeal that comes from a deep understanding of human nature. Here are the farm laborers, dancers, kitchen workers, and soldiers who make up a world that is wrought with pain, nostalgia, and stunning grace. From the widowed Filipino father raising a son in a migrant work camp to the young veteran haunted by the ghost of war, The Weight of the Sun shows us not only what it is to be human, but how the human spirit can grow when faced with overwhelming adversity. Tagatac brings these characters home in our hearts with a poise and dignity that marks a new and powerful voice in short fiction.

Good Friday By Tony Wolk

$14.95

Brace yourself for a collision between 1865 and 1955. Joan Matcham has just discovered that she’s pregnant by a man who died ninety years earlier: Abraham Lincoln. His brief sojourn to the Illinois of 1955 ended, he is returned to his own time and place, leaving Joan to deal with the consequences of their night together. Even as friendship, impending motherhood, and a new love revive Joan, she is haunted by recurring visions of the last week of Lincoln’s life. This alternative history tale brings Lincoln’s emotions and thoughts to the modern reader, from 1865, through 1955, all the way to us in the present. With references to Shakespeare, Arabian Nights and others, Tony Wolk’s Good Friday is truly an intimate and compelling story that defies classification and appeals to readers across genres.

You Have Time For This By Mark Budman & Tom Hazuka

$11.95

Love, death, fantasy, and foreign lands, told with brevity and style by the best writers in the short-short fiction genre. You Have Time for This satiates your craving for fine literature without making a dent in your schedule. This collection takes the modern reader on fifty-three literary rides, each one only five hundred words or fewer. Mark Budman and Tom Hazuka, two of the top names in the genre, have compiled an anthology of mini-worlds that are as diverse as the authors who created them. Contributing writers include Steve Almond, author of My Life in Heavy Metal and Candy-freak; Aimee Bender, author of The Girl in the Flammable Skirt; Robert Boswell, author of five novels including Century’s Son; Alex Irvine, author of A Scattering of Jades; L. E. Leone who writes a weekly humorous column about food and life for the San Francisco Bay Guardian; Justine Musk, author of dark-fantasy novels including Blood Angel; Susan O’Neill, writer of nonfiction and fiction with a book of short stories Don’t Mean Nothing; Short Stories of Vietnam; Katharine Weber author of several novels, the most recent of which is Triangle.

Do Angels Cry? Tales of the War By Matko Marušić

$14.95

In 1991, war broke out in Croatia. Matko Marušić’s short stories offer a human perspective on the war that is not told in history books. Each story illuminates the love and dedication the Croatian people have for their country, and their struggle to find purpose and meaning in the midst of tragedy. Matko Marušić’s other writings include a novel, a collection of short stories for children, and two additional collections of short stories for adults. Do Angels Cry? Tales of the War was originally published in Croatia and Great Britain in 1996. A preface, written by Dr. Stanimir Vuk-Pavlovic, has been added for the American edition.

Lincoln’s Daughter By Tony Wolk

$14.95

Lincoln’s Daughter completes Tony Wolk’s Lincoln “Out of Time” trilogy about inexplicable, time-traveling Abraham Lincoln, and the widow who gives birth to his daughter. A Lincoln scholar himself, Wolk blends historical facts and people with fictional characters, skillfully bringing time, place, and president to life—once again proving his dedication to both history and literature. It’s 1964, and Abraham Lincoln’s daughter, Sarah, daydreams about meeting her father.

Close is Fine By Eliot Treichel

$14.95

Life’s private reflections, big and small, shape and define the characters in Eliot Treichel’s debut short story collection. Rural Wisconsin—the lonely, aching expanse of quiet isolation—doubles as a metaphor for the characters who yearn for a closeness in personal relationships that is just out of grasp. A rivalry between lumberjacks reaches a sticky end. A man’s substandard work on his house mirrors his halfhearted attempt to fix his marriage. A little girl’s valorous rescue of mice is lost on her unsentimental father. High school soccer teams, bear cubs, dog sledding—all are masterfully woven together in a landscape that becomes a character in itself. Treichel expertly captures the voice of the individual, allowing any individual, anywhere, who has felt the inescapable pangs of loneliness, to connect to his characters’ aching hearts and quiet plights.

Up Nights By Daniel Kine

$13.95

Up Nights, Daniel Kine’s second book, is a classic road novel for a new generation. In raw, unrelenting prose, Kine tells the story of the complexities of human relationships when four friends embark on an existential journey through the underbelly of society. As they drift from city to city, they each struggle to connect with the disenchanted people they encounter along the way. Up Nights speaks to the reality of the human condition: the unequivocal impermanence of life.

Siblings and Other Disappointments By Kait Heacock

$15.95

A widower searching for solace in competitive eating. A mother and daughter preparing their living room for the rapture. A young couple looking for reasons to reconnect on a trip to the mountains. A grieving sister and her alcoholic brother sharing a home for the first time since childhood. Siblings and Other Disappointments follows an array of characters searching for comfort—in parents and children, in brothers and sisters, in strangers and friends. Scattered throughout the Pacific Northwest, its twelve stories are stories of place, as stark and infinitely complex as the landscape itself. Author Kait Heacock’s debut collection is an examination of relationships and isolation within working-class families and a tribute to the little victories and traumas of everyday life.

Zagreb, Exit South By Edo Popovic

$12.95

Zagreb, Exit South is a deep, melancholy book about the resignation of the 40 year old, about people who have given up on life, who can only exist on the street or in bars because they fear and dread going home to their high-rise caverns in New Zagreb where the rules of an allegedly organized world reign. But Popovic’s characters have no patience with the lies of this world. They have no patience because they have neither homes nor a homeland: they have lost all their illusions.

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